Modern Domestic Cookery, and Useful Receipt Book. Adapted for Families... Enlarged and Improved by D. Hughson with Specific Approved Patent Receipts, Extracted from the Records..

Price: 450.00 USD

New York: Published by Leavitt & Allen, no. 379 Broadway, 1857. Octavo, 360, 61, xii, pages. Engraved title and frontispiece. Illustrated with two engraved plates. A later American edition of this work, originally titled The Housekeeper's Instructor (London 1791), including Hughson's improvements and the New Family Receipt Book, reprinted here with separate pagination. As Cagle reminds us, "this is an entirely different work from Elizabeth Hammond's Modern Domestic Cookery." Chapters include: Soups and Broths - Boiling - Roasting - Baking - Broiling - Frying - Stewing - Hashing and Mincing - Fricaseeing - Ragoos - Gravies, Cullises, and Other Sauces - Made Dishes - Vegetables and Roots - Boiled Puddings - Pies - Pancakes and Fritters - Tarts and Puffs - Cheesecakes and Custards - Cakes, Biscuits, &c. - The Art of Confectionery - Pickling - Collaring - Potting Meat and Poultry - Curing of Various Kinds of Meats - Methods of Keeping Vegetables, Fruits, &c. - Possets and Gruels - Made Wines, &c. - Cordial Waters - The Art of Brewing - Directions for Trussing Poultry, &c. Although the book is in its original blind-stamped and gilt-titled brown cloth, the text block appears to have been trimmed down, with narrow margins, and so we wonder if it was stereotyped onto a smaller page than originally intended, to fit standard American case binding sizes of the era. Some light foxing throughout; later ink name and comment to two preliminaries. Medicinal newspaper clippings pasted to endpapers, including Cure for Cholera, Cure for Scrofula, Hydropathia, and The Tomato as a Food. With the bookplate "Library of Sam. C. Colt". Sam. C. was either the son or nephew of the industrialist and inventor of the revolver. Sam. C.'s mother, Caroline Henshaw Colt, was married to Samuel Colt, and later to Samuel's brother John. After Samuel's death Sam. C. produced a marriage certificate, and successfully argued that he was indeed son of Samuel, earning a piece of the estate. [Bitting, page 224; Cagle 354; Lowenstein 735].


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