New "Dual Missions' of the Immigration Enforcement Agencies; Hearing before the Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security, and Claims of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, One Hundred Ninth Congress, First Session, May 5, 2005, S

Price: 45.00 USD

Washington DC: U. S. Government Printing Office, 2005. iii, [1], 75, [1] pages. Map. Illustrations. In the Chairman's opening statement, he remarked "The Homeland Security Act, enacted in November 2002, split the former Immigration and Naturalization Service, or INS, into separate immigration service and enforcement agencies, both within the Department of Homeland Security. This split had been pursued by Chairman Sensenbrenner based on testimony and evidence that the dual missions of INS had resulted in poor performance. There was a constant tug-of-war between providing good service to law-abiding aliens and enforcing the law against law-breakers. The plain language of the Homeland Security Act, Title D, creates a ''Bureau of Border Security,'' and specifically transfers all immigration enforcement functions of INS into it. Yet when it came down to actually creating the two: new agencies, the Administration veered off course. Although the service functions of INS were transferred to USCIS, the enforcement side of INS was split in two, what is now Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, to handle interior enforcement, and Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to guard our borders. ICE was given all Customs agents, investigators, intelligence and analysis-from the Treasury Department, as well as the Federal Protective Service to guard Federal buildings, and the Federal Air Marshals to protect our airplanes, and finally the INS investigators. CBP was given all Treasury Customs inspectors at the ports-of entry, Agriculture Inspector from the Department Of Agriculture, and INS inspectors. At no time during the reorganization planning was it anticipated by the Committee that an immigration enforcement agency would share its role with other enforcement functions,such as enforcement of our customs laws. This simply results in the creation of dual or multiple missions that the act sought to avoid in the first place. Failure to adhere to the statutory framework established by HSA has produced immigration enforcement incoherence that undermines the immigration enforcement mission central to DHS, and undermines the security of our Nation's borders and citizens." Presumed First Edition, First printing. Very good.


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